Category Archives: technology and disability

Disability Match Disabled Living and Mobility Shop

Exciting announcement!  We have just launched a disabilitymatch shop to supply our community with mobility goods and services at excellent prices.  The project is at an early stage but hopefully we will get support and the store will flourish.  We already have lots of items from mobility scooters to adapted beds and even small items for hearing aids.

The disabilitymatch shop
The disabilitymatch shop

We hope that you will check out our selection of items the next time you are buying mobility aids and see how our prices compare.  We ship through Amazon so you can be sure that your purchases will arrive swiftly and efficiently.

Amazing Innovations in Amputee Prosthetics.

I am fascinated by the amazing advances we are seeing in 3d printing technology and how it can help provide prosthetic limbs at a reasonable price and at great speed.  Open Bionics a Bristol-based company is a UK leader in this field.

Open Bionics has teamed up with a researcher at the University of Bristol to create a dual material, custom, 3D printed splint for people with broken wrists.

Abby Taylor and Open Bionics’ mechanical engineer Jonathan Raines created an innovative 3D printed medical splint by combining PLA and Ninja Flex (a thermoplastic elastomer) with two extruders on a desktop 3D printer.

The researcher asked Open Bionics to help her bring her idea to life by using their 3D scanning and 3D printing methods.

Open Bionics did so by 3D scanning Abby’s wrist before applying a Voronoi pattern to the model and then 3D printed a custom-fitted, dual material splint.

The design combines the strength of PLA with the flexibility and softness of the filament printed on the inside. The flexible material also acts as a living hinge, meaning patients can get in and out of the splint with ease.

Abby said: “We hope to create an alternative to conventional casting that is often heavy and impractical. We want to improve the wearer’s experience.”

This first print which fit comfortably, is a sign that 3D printing could enable patients to have an improved splint that’s ‘way more integrative’ with the daily life of the patient.

Open Bionics estimated that the material costs for the splint, which prints in one part, is just £2.

The innovative startup will be supporting Abby’s research into alternative medical casting for broken or injured wrists for the next year while continuing to develop their low-cost bionic hands.

 

Disability Innovations: How 3D printing will make orthotics smarter, faster and cheaper

Andiamo is a start up creating healthcare solutions for disabled children, with a mission to see no child ever having to wait more than one week to receive a medical device.

They are working to combine 3D scanning, printing and bio-mechanical models to create orthotics for children with a range of impairments from cereal palsy, spina bifida or spinal injuries, to strokes and the side effects of chemotherapy.

Naveed and Samiya Parvez are parents from London whose son, Diamo, was born with cereal palsy. They are also the founders of Andiamo.

Having been through the orthotics system with Diamo, so they know firsthand the discomfort and hassle involved in being measured and fitted for a new back ace. The process currently involves the child having to lie still for an hour to have a plaster of Paris cast made before waiting up to 28 weeks for the new orthotic to be made.

We all know how children can grow out of shoes and clothes in a matter of weeks, so it’s no surprise that by the time many children receive their orthosis months later they no longer fit. The current system is not only old fashioned but also painful, slow and expensive.