Tag Archives: disabled sex

Stylish Fetish Video Released

Within the disabled community there has always been an interest in the ‘bizarre’ sex-wise as anyone who has ever attended the ‘Night of the senses’ or the ‘Sex Maniacs Ball’ as it used to be that is run by the Outsiders charity.   Truly I have never seen so many interesting deviations from the so-called sexual norm in my life.   So I was delighted when a really cool ‘grunge-style’ video crossed my inbox produced by a fetish dating site  – fetishwombat.com – which is graphically striking and has a compelling musical soundtrack.

I love the outfits and the whole spirit of the video.  I have been talking recently with our Sexpert Robin on our podcast to discuss more about disability and fetish since we had excellent feedback when she talked about amputee pretenders in a recent podcast episode.   I must ask her to do more on the subject.

New Podcast Episode is available for download.

Our latest podcast is ready for fee download from the podcast.disabilitymatch.co.uk site or from iTunes or most other podcast platforms.  We hope you enjoy it.  If you have 40minutes to while away then this is the podcast for you.  It is an upbeat discussion on a variety of disability issues and our guests are shown in the video above.

Hope you enjoy it.

 

David

3rd Episode of disabilitymatch Podcast

Very happy that we have released our 3rd podcast episode!  I am getting into the flow of things now, also we are getting great guests agreeing to be interviwed because they like our style.  We are upbeat and communicative.  Anyway you judge for yourselves

 

We have almost 100 downloads on our first day and we have high hopes of reaching 300 downloads by the end of the week.  We have great guests on the show and our twitter following is amazingly supportive.  We depend on you to share our podcast links and help get it widely known on all social media.  Disabilitymatch is a vibrant community and we are thrilled to be able to help you get the most from it.

 

 

New Podcast Episode Goes Live

We are very excited to announce that episode 2 of our podcast is out and live  – you can download /listen here http://podcast.disabilitymatch.co.uk/spoonies-campus-tips/ or on iTunes/soundcloud etc.  We think it is pretty good.  we have a feature interview with ‘The Disabled Diva’ from California who is great fun and has a positive spin on being a ‘spoonie’.  We have our regular experts talking about accessible travel and about sex for the disabled. We also welcome a new guest from the University of Strathclyde – Raj who is a student diversity official.  S, as you can see the podcast gas something for everyne.  Please listen to it and share the link on all your social media.

Disability Innovations: How 3D printing will make orthotics smarter, faster and cheaper

Andiamo is a start up creating healthcare solutions for disabled children, with a mission to see no child ever having to wait more than one week to receive a medical device.

They are working to combine 3D scanning, printing and bio-mechanical models to create orthotics for children with a range of impairments from cereal palsy, spina bifida or spinal injuries, to strokes and the side effects of chemotherapy.

Naveed and Samiya Parvez are parents from London whose son, Diamo, was born with cereal palsy. They are also the founders of Andiamo.

Having been through the orthotics system with Diamo, so they know firsthand the discomfort and hassle involved in being measured and fitted for a new back ace. The process currently involves the child having to lie still for an hour to have a plaster of Paris cast made before waiting up to 28 weeks for the new orthotic to be made.

We all know how children can grow out of shoes and clothes in a matter of weeks, so it’s no surprise that by the time many children receive their orthosis months later they no longer fit. The current system is not only old fashioned but also painful, slow and expensive.

Scope Helps Disabled Couples Normalise Sex

I must say how impressed I am with the video Scope have released showing disabled couples getting frisky.

Sex is a wonderful thing for all of us and we all enjoy it in different ways.  I know how wonderful I feel when I go to the Erotic Awards event – Night of the SEnses’ and see the variety of delicious sexualities being acted out by folk with all ranges of disability.   This is why I am so proud to be running disabilitymatch which helps so many UK daters look beyond the disability and enjoy the person.

Disability and Sexuality Negative Viewpoints

There was an interesting article in the Independent newspaper

Here is an important quote from the article.
Research has shown that disabled people are less likely to have a long-term partner or marry than non-disabled people (although this is dependent on impairment type). When a 2014 newspaper poll asked Britons if they had ever had sex with someone who had a physical disability, 44 per cent said: “No, and I don’t think I would.”

Disabled people’s sexuality has been suppressed, exploited and, at times, destroyed, over many centuries. It has been seen as suspect, set apart and different from the sexuality of non-disabled people. So how can we shift the negative images of disability and sexuality that still dominate society’s attitudes? Well, disabled people and their allies have been campaigning for change for decades and, while it is not going to be easy, change is on the way. But with it comes new controversies.

Dr Tom Shakespeare, a disabled academic, wrote The Sexual Politics of Disability nearly 20 years ago, and it remains one of the few evidence-based studies in the field. “Images of disability and sexuality either tend to be absent – disabled people being presented as asexual – or else perverse and hypersexual,” he says.

He believes that, in the wider community, disabled men (and, to a lesser extent, women), are rendered impotent and sexless by disability, and thus are seen as unattractive and vulnerable to mockery and exploitation. (As Cicero wrote: “In deformity and bodily disfigurement, there is good material in making jokes.”) And this may explain an assumption often made in the past – that it was better to shield disabled people from reaching out for sexual relationships rather than risk the chance of them being rejected. There was an expectation that disabled people’s sexual desires should be set aside and ignored, because they should not – or could not – be satisfied.